‏إظهار الرسائل ذات التسميات blog. إظهار كافة الرسائل
‏إظهار الرسائل ذات التسميات blog. إظهار كافة الرسائل

11/21/2017

When food is used as a weapon In Yemen

When food is used as a weapon IN Yemen.

WHAT HAPPEN IN YEMEN WILL NOT STAY IN YEMEN  
FOR EVER

 

  
This month Saudi Arabia tightened a stranglehold on the neighboring country of Yemen and 7 million people face starvation. The Saudi blockade is an escalation in Yemen's civil war. The United Nations says the war has now become a "man-made catastrophe." You've seen very little of this because the Saudis prevent reporters from reaching the war zone. Recently, we were ordered off a ship headed to Yemen. Days later the Saudis gave us permission to fly there but, after our equipment was loaded and our boarding passes issued, the Saudis closed the airspace so the plane couldn't take off. Even so, we have managed to get pictures out of Yemen to show you what the Saudi government does not want you to see. This will be hard to watch, but 27 million people in Yemen pray you will not turn away.


yemen-child-3.jpg
A child in Yemen
Hungry children cry. But there are no tears at the limits of starvation. Wasting bodies cannot afford them. This is the Al Sabeen Hospital in the Yemeni city of Sana'a. Ibtisam is two and a half. She weighs 15 pounds. Haifa is seven. She weighs 11 pounds. The images, and stories from the hospital, were sent to us by people that we hired inside Yemen. One child dies every ten minutes in the country according to the U.N..
David Beasley runs the World Food Programme, the U.N.'s emergency first responder to prevent famine.
David Beasley: It's just desperation and death. It is as bad as it gets. I don't know if I've ever seen a movie this bad.
Scott Pelley: We were headed into Yemen with the World Food Programme, the Saudis gave us permission to come, and then when we arrived they wouldn't let us into the country. What do you think they didn't want us to see?
David Beasley: I don't understand why they won't allow the world to see what's taking place. Because I think if the world sees the tragedy of this human sufferin', number one, the world will step up and provide the support financially for innocent children to eat. But when you get on the ground and see what I see, you see is chaos, is starvation, is hunger, and it's unnecessary conflict strictly man-made. All parties involved in this conflict have their hands guilty, the hands are dirty. All parties.



"We're on the brink of famine. If we don't receive the monies that we need in the next few months, I would say 125,000 little girls and boys will die."

In essence, the fight is between the two main branches of Islam. The Shia branch occupies much of the West, the Sunnis most of the South and East. Saudi Arabia, leader of the Sunni world, began airstrikes against Shia rebels, more than two years ago. The rebels, who are known as Houthis, are supported by Saudi Arabia's arch enemy, Iran, the leader of the Shia world.
Houthi rebels have plenty of blood on their hands, including the deaths of 1,000 civilians. But the U.N. says the Saudi coalition has killed more than 3,000 civilians; bombing schools, hospitals and Al Kubra hall, scene of a funeral last year. 132 Civilians were killed, nearly 700 wounded. Still, the deadliest weapon in Yemen is a blockade holding up food, fuel and medical aid.
David Beasley: We can't get our ships in. They get blocked
Scott Pelley: Who blocks the ports?
David Beasley: The Saudi coalition.
David Beasley told us the Saudis bombed the cranes that unload ships. The U.S. sent replacement cranes. But the Saudis won't let them in.
David Beasley: We ask any, any parties engaged in this conflict to respect humanitarian law, respect the rights of innocent people and give us the access that we need to provide the help that's needed.
Scott Pelley: It sounds like the Saudis are using starvation as a weapon.
David Beasley: I don't think there's any question the Saudi-led coalition, along with the Houthis and all of those involved, are using food as a weapon of war. And it's disgraceful.

yemen-child-1.jpg
A child in Yemen
The U.N. World Food Programmer is the largest humanitarian aid agency. The U.S. is its biggest donor, so the director is most often an American. Beasley was once governor of South Carolina.
David Beasley: We're on the brink of famine. If we don't receive the monies that we need in the next few months, I would say 125,000 little girls and boys will die. We've been able to avert famine, but we know three things that are happenin'. We know that people are dying. We know that people are wasting. And we know that children are stunting. We have a stunting rate in Yemen now at almost 50 percent. That means they're smaller, the brains are smaller, the body's smaller because they're not getting the food or the nutrition they need.
The World Food Programme's Stephen Anderson is trying to move millions of pounds of food to Yemen from an African port in Djibouti.
Stephen Anderson: The World Food Programme is mobilizing food for seven million people. Now what that looks like is a 110-pound bag of wheat flour. We're aiming to provide two million of those every month to the people of Yemen.
Scott Pelley: How long can you keep that up?
Stephen Anderson: Well, we're desperately praying for peace. Because that's the only sustainable way of really rebuilding the situation our stated objective is to try to prevent a famine from occurring.

stephen-anderson-in-yemen-food-distribution.jpg
Stephen Anderson distributes food
CBS News
While facing imminent famine, the people of Yemen are also suffering one of the biggest cholera epidemics in history. Nearly a million have been infected with the bacteria which inflicts diarrhea, dehydration and sometimes death. The disease thrives in dirty water. And water treatment and sanitation have collapsed in Yemen's cities.
Nevio Zagaria heads the World Health Organization's emergency response.
Scott Pelley: What do you have to have to stop the epidemic?
Nevio Zagaria: We should have peace. This is what we need to stop this epidemic. So we cannot solve the problem of cholera if we do not have a proper safe water supply, if we do not have proper sanitation. If we do not have the sewage treatment plant in the main town functioning and stop because it runs out of fuel as it happened at the beginning of this epidemic in the north of Sana'a for three or four months.
Scott Pelley: The main sewage plant in Sana'a ran out of fuel and didn't run for three or four months?
Nevio Zagaria: Yes. So 3 million people, huh?
About two million Yemenis have been forced from their homes by the war and there's been a big exodus of refugees that the world doesn't know very much about. Many of them have come 25 miles across the Red Sea to a refugee camp in the African nation of Djibouti. It is a testament to how bad things are in Yemen that the refugees believe that this place is so much better.
We've seen a few refugee camps in our time but this may be the most desolate with a drought of life and flood of sun. One worker told us we were smart to come in fall when it cooled off to 110.

Scott Pelley: How long have you been here?
Ali Shafick: Unfortunately 28 months.
Ali Shafick was once an architect in the Yemeni capital. His home was destroyed. He's alone here. And his despair was almost like madness.
Ali Shafick: To be jobless in this camp is very sad. The time is going slowly, very slowly.
Scott Pelley: The heat must be unbearable.
Ali Shafick: Heat? Yes, boiling. Starting from June, July and August. Three months. You cannot live, you cannot live here, three months. It's impossible to live.
Scott Pelley: And yet you do.
Ali Shafick: I have to be patient. I have to be patient.

djibouti-refugee-camp.jpg
Djibouti refugee camp
CBS News
This mother, Ameena Saleh, told us her family left after Saudi led airstrikes killed more than 70 people in her town.
The planes would fly above us and fire rockets and missiles she told us. At night there was no sleep, they were holding the young ones. She said that her older son was saying 'we are going to die.' She told us we saw people die right in front of us.
Scott Pelley: A little while ago we heard a rumble from the direction of Yemen. That's the bombing, isn't it?
Yes, her husband said, it's near.
Scott Pelley: What do you think when you hear that?
Strong fear, she said. She said the terror is still inside us from the rockets, missiles and planes.
Ayman Gharaibeh runs Yemeni refugee relief for the U.N..
Scott Pelley: What lies ahead for these people, given where we are today?
Ayman Gharaibeh: Remember, the conflict is going into a third year, some people has been displaced for literally three years or going into their third year.  I honestly do not see any silver lining anywhere on the horizon that this is gonna end soon. And I'm afraid the humanitarian situation will continue to deteriorate. And we would go from a displacement to a famine, as happened, to cholera, and God knows what's next.

"All the children are gonna be dead. It's terrible."

The Saudi intervention in Yemen began with the rise of 32-year-old Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman, he's the son of the king and he's the defense minister. Salman is quickly reforming the kingdom's fundamentalist society. Recently, he lifted the ban on women drivers. This month, he arrested 200 Saudis including princes and media owners. He says it's a crackdown on corruption. His critics believe he's silencing his rivals. Salman's campaign in Yemen has now landed Saudi Arabia, for the first time, on the U.N.'s blacklist of nations that disregard the safety of children in war.
The Saudis have pledged $8 billion in humanitarian aid for Yemen, but they've delivered very little of that. The head of the Saudi humanitarian agency says that its aid to Yemen is, quote, "way beyond any damage caused by any attacks."

Scott Pelley: You met with some government officials involved in all of this, what kind of dialogue did you have with them?
David Beasley: Well we met with officials on all sides. They said all the right things. And we come back, everything that they agreed to on visas and access, so that we can get the equipment we need in, so we can deliver the food where we need to deliver it, and the technology and the health product -- you know -- terrible. The conditions are deteriorating in an unprecedented way and none of the commitments that were made, by any and all sides, have been fulfilled.
Scott Pelley: What future do you see for Yemen?
David Beasley: I don't see a light at the end of this tunnel. There's gotta be a big change. As the World Food Program, I've got my mandate to feed people. But also as a U.N. leader, I call upon the leaders of the world to bring the pressure to bear whatever's necessary to get the Saudi-led coalition, the Houthis and all involved to the table and end this thing. You keep goin' like you're goin', there's not gonna be anybody left. All the children are gonna be dead. It's terrible.
Produced by Nicole Young and Katie Kerbstat

60 Minutes, barred from Yemen,still got the footage





https://www.cbsnews.com/news/60-minutes-barred-from-yemen-still-got-the-footage/ 

10/29/2017

THINGS IN EGYPT THAT ARE SCARIER THAN HALLOWEEN

THINGS IN EGYPT THAT ARE SCARIER THAN HALLOWEEN


There’s a reason Halloween never caught on in Egypt. White people may find zombies, goblins, vampires, and Jerry Springer scary, but we stuff koshary into plastic bags and squeeze it into our mouths and there’s literally nothing scarier. Let’s see if you people can handle our daily horrors.

Tattooed Eyebrows
Miss, you have giant skid marks where your eyebrows should be. 
Soccer Moms Driving in Hyundai Matrix
--------




Ma'am, would you mind terribly driving like the gremlins didn't just invade your car (and your mind)?  
Applying for a Schengen Visa



 So, like, not to call institutional racism bullshit, but this is some institutional racism bullshit. 



Being a Cat in Nady El Gezira


 we ever get reincarnated as felines in Egypt, we hope we have the good sense not to wander into Gezira Club. Unless, we come back as a panthera felines, in which case we'll be more than happy to give Gezira Club a taste of their own medicine.
Being a Maid in an Upscale Sahel Resort



Hey, Sahel, the 50s called, they want their segregated pools back!
Mogammaa Tahrir
How would you like to claw your way to the clerk's desk while slip 'n sliding in other people's sweat?
Kameen El Zaarafana
Why yes, officer, I do have glaucoma! 


She will ruin your life and slut shame you for being sexually harassed, and then she'll celebrate with an awful rendition of Despacito that somehow makes the original sound like a classic masterpiece. 
 This



The Moral Epidemic of Egypt: 99% of Women Are Sexually Harassed







10/23/2017

Zabbaleen: Trash Town. A whole community in Egypt that lives on rubbish

Zabbaleen: Trash Town. A whole community in Egypt that lives on rubbish
Tens of thousands of people live in Zabbaleen, on the outskirts of Cairo, Egypt, they all make a living out of recycling the entire capital city’s refuse. Their whole town is practically a giant dump and it provides them with almost everything they need: from kids’ toys to fodder for livestock. Even their pigs play an important part in recycling food waste. Most important of all though, the dump provides livelihoods for the people of Zabbaleen.
Every one of the rubbish collectors plays their own part, gathering, transporting or sorting the rubbish. Collectively, everyone in the community performs a highly efficient job of recycling Cairo’s refuse. This allows the trash town to be self-sufficient and largely independent from the rest of the city. The place has its own rules, everyone is allocated their own patch of Cairo, no one would think of collecting from someone else’s area

2/08/2016

Dar al-Hajar ِAnd Jambiya In Yemen

Sana'a, Yemen

Buying a SIM card for your phone in Yemen entails giving a copy of the picture page and visa stamp of your passport to the store-owner which he presumably passes along to the appropriate authorities, and filling out an application form which must be stamped with your left thumbprint.  A phone call is then made to some mysterious entity and only then do you get your cellphone number. One assumes in these disturbing times, that the Yemeni government wants to keep tabs on who’s who. (It is interesting to note which countries keep close tabs on such things. In Algeria, Egypt, Palestine, Lebanon and Syria you pay cash and trundle off with the new SIM and phone number, nary a piece of paperwork in sight. In Tunisia, Libya and Yemen your passport is required and recorded. I cannot quite find the common thread there.....)  The good news is that the SIM card and a charge card costs the grand total of $12.  Email is also very cheap here at 50 cents an hour (100 Yemeni Riyals) for relatively fast connection, with internet cafes everywhere in the major cities.
Sanashills
A view of Old Sana'a from the rooftop of one of the city's many samsarahs.
Sana’a has a long history. It is said to have been founded by Shem, son of Noah. Arabs are descended from Shem, hence the term Semitic......Arabs, like their Jewish brethren, are a Semitic people - a little known fact, especially in the US where the term ‘Semitic’  has come to be associated exclusively with Jews  - an absurd, but by now well-established, nonsense.
Yemenis or South Arabians, are often considered to be ‘pure’ Arabs, being descended from Qahtan, (associated with Joktan a descendant of Shem, in the book of Genesis), while ‘northern Arabians’ are descended from Ishmael, son of Abraham and Hagar. (Adnan, who was mentioned in an earlier post as father of north Arabians, is a descendant of Ishmael.) The term ‘Arab’ seems to have been recorded in written records for the first time in Assyrian texts dating back to 853BC. There may be frequent reference to lineage in the coming posts and this is because it is extremely important in Bedouin or 'pure' Arab culture. But as Ibn Battuta would say, "but we will talk of this later."
Like other areas of the Arabian peninsula, Christianity was well established in Yemen by the mid-4th century but the last Himyarite King, Dhu Nuwas, who ruled from 495-525AD converted to Judaism and began to persecute Christians, culminating in the massacre of the entire Christian population of Najran, now in SW Saudi Arabia. The Byzantines, both affronted and powerless, asked their fellow Christian Ethiopians to attack Yemen to protect the remnants of the Christians, which they did under the Axumite General, Abraha.  He destroyed the Himyarite regime and installed himself as ruler, but the Yemenis asked the Persians for help in ousting the Ethiopians, and by 575AD they were installed as governors.
SanaarooftopsAnother view of the unique and magnificent architecture of the old City of Sana'a
Judaism has lengthy roots in Yemen and although it is not known exactly when it was established, it is assumed that after the destruction of the Temple in 70AD, some Jews made their way south to Yemen. Until 1948, there was a strong Jewish community but today the numbers are reduced to only a few hundred, mainly in the north in Sa’ada. Christianity did not fare so well - one of the reasons it did not take root long enough to survive in depth the coming of Islam, was the Byzantine Church’s heavy handedness in dealing with what it considered its heretical elements, i.e. the monotheistic creed that was embraced by many of the Eastern churches.  When the Muslims marched out of Arabia into neighboring lands not requiring - indeed initially not even wanting - their subjects to convert, paradoxically many elected not only to live under Muslim rule which was more benign than that of Constantinople, but to convert. (The benefit of conversion was exemption from the tax that all non-Muslims paid.)
But back to present-day Sana’a. The open-air medieval souk is the heart of old Sana’a. Now called Souk al-Milh, or Salt Souk, this name used to refer only to the segment of the souk designated for that trade - in years gone by 40 trades were conducted in the souk.Metalworkers
Creating some small metal part the old-fashioned way - no protective clothing in sight...
Nowadays you can still find metalworkers, jambiya makers, carpenters and potters at work in their tiny shops while in the retail section of the souk are spices, dates, tobacco, coffee, tea, perfumes, incense, silver, jambiyyas and embroidered belts, basketry, jewelry, textiles, and household items. In former times goods arrived on camelback to a samsarah or khan where they were bought from local merchants - some of those samsarahs have been converted into art galleries although a few are still used for storage. 



Jambiya - the curved dagger no self-respecting Yemeni would step outside his home without.
Jambiya

As for the tower houses of old Sana’a, the most iconic in the country is in Wadi Dahr, Beit al-Hajjar. Located on a limestone outcrop north of the capital it was originally built in the 18th century but was renovated in the 1930s as a summer residence for Imam Yahya. It is still used by the government for official functions. 






Wadi_dahr001
It has all the components of a traditional tower house; several storeys of gypsum-traced windows, extravagant colored glass qamariyya windows, and shubaq, the protruding encased window ledge used for keeping meat and dairy products cool in the days before refrigeration. 
The most famous house in Yemen - Beit al-Hajjar in Wadi Dahr, near the capital.





I had been hospitably entertained in a tower house in the old City currently being rented by a friend - all five storeys of it.  Now I was about to go off into the wilds of Yemen with Abdullah Khawlani, driver and trusted friend. It promised to be memorable... Abdullah does not speak much English, although he understands far more than he lets on,  and my Arabic is execrable especially when I have to translate pages of text relating to the 14th century, text that dwells on matters most sensible people have long ago left off thinking about. Back on the trail of Ibn Battuta who landed in northern Yemen by boat, I am doing no such thing -  I am traveling in a Land Cruiser from Sana’a. But first I had to visit the pharmacy - it is the rainy season, albeit the short one, and as I am going to be spending some time on the coast where the climate is noxious at the best of times and mosquitoes abound, a dose of malaria would be tiresome even if Sana’a does have some perfectly good hospitals now. In Yemen as in many Middle Eastern countries, you can buy most drugs over the counter for a fraction of the cost you pay at home, so here's to $2 Larium and hypnotic dreams......
BabyemenYemeni President Ali Abdullah Saleh looks down protectively over his flock at Bab Yemen, principal gate of the Old City.

11/20/2015

WHAT YOU WELL NEVER SEE IN YEMEN WAR

THAT YOU WELL  NEVER THE ANY MEDIA WELL SHOW  WHAT  AL SAUD KEELING THE YEMENIS EVERY HOUR


--> --> ----

(al-Ahed News) ~ About a week ago, Saudi warplanes committed a terrible massacre against a group of Yemeni fishermen on the Island of A’qban in the Province of al-Hadida, killing around 150 fishermen. 














بلاغ صحفي وتضامن#اوقفوا_قتل_الصيادين
Posted by ‎تجمع أحرار اليمن‎ on Thursday, 19 November 2015


#اوقفوا_قتل_الصيادين مجزرة صيادين الخوخة إلى قائمة مجازر الساحل الغربي .. والنوايا تكشفت لماذا ؟http://yalmashhad.com/news/2418
Posted by ‎المشهد اليمني الاول‎ on Thursday, 19 November 2015

#اوقفوا_قتل_الصيادينال سعود المجرمون..لا يمضي يوم إلا ويقتلون المستضعفين في يمن الإيمان والحكمة.كل يوم شهداء كل يوم جر...
Posted by ‎محمد ابو المجد‎ on Thursday, 19 November 2015


#اوقفوا_قتل_الصيادين
--> -->

6/17/2015

#Ramadan Kareem 2015


And 
how to have good Ramadan ISA






For every important event in our life it is useful to plan ahead and make needed preparations so that this occasion becomes an unforgettable event.
Days are passing quickly as we are fast approaching the month of Ramadan.
If you ask most Muslims about last Ramadan, they would tell you it feels very close, like only a few weeks or months ago.
Are you waiting for Ramadan and looking forward to its start?
Are you happy that Ramadan is nearly here, or are you worried about fasting in the summer?
Have you prepared yet your plan and program for the best month of the year?
A Gift From Allah


The month of Ramadan is one of those important occasions that we witness once a year. It is a gift from God. It is a golden opportunity for Muslims to get closer to God by increasing good deeds.
Ramadan is the month in which Muslims observe the obligatory fast which has been prescribed by God on those who believe in Him as it was prescribed on previous nations.
{O you who believe! Fasting is prescribed for you, even as it was prescribed for those before you, that you may attain piety.} (Al-Baqarah 2: 183)
The above verse explains the main purpose of fasting. It is to attain taqwa (God-consciousness) which means that every Muslim must be watchful of everything. He must watch out every word he utters and every action he does.

The literal manifestation of fasting is to abstain from food, drink and intimate relations from dawn to sunset. But the real meaning of fasting goes far beyond that. It is about avoiding gossip, backbiting, evil and idle talks, arrogance, lying, breaking promises, dishonesty, severing social ties, etc. 

Prophet Muhammad is reported to have said:
"Whoever fails to leave off ruinous speech, and acting on it [during Ramadan], God does not need him to leave off eating and drinking." (Al-Bukhari)


Fasting is an excellent training opportunity on self-restraint as the fast teaches patience and perseverance. Prophet Muhammad (peace be upon him) is reported to have said:

The Prophet describes the month of fasting as the month of patience because fasting teaches how to control one's inner self and its desires.
Every Muslim should do his best to make the coming month of Ramadan a landmark event this year. Put a target for yourself, like for example having all your sins forgiven by Allah and that you will be saved from Hellfire.
Ask yourself are you pleased with what you did last Ramadan? 

Will this Ramadan be the same as last year? 

Let this Ramadan be the beginning of real change. 

Make this Ramadan different from previous ones. 

Start to practice an act of worship that you never did before, or increase the acts of worship that you used to do before.

If you used to read the Quran once during the month of Ramadan, this year read it twice.

 If you used to do Tarawih (Night prayers) alone, this year perform it in congregation. 

If you did not give charity, this year make it a daily habit to give to the needy what you can afford, even if it is a small amount.

If you did not observe any voluntary fasting since last Ramadan, train yourself to observe fasting during the month of Sha`ban as the Prophet used to do.

I would like to also warn of negative preparations for Ramadan which some people do by storing too much food and drink, as if Ramadan is the month for eating not a month for abstaining from food and drink from dawn to sunset.

Fasting was prescribed two months before the obligation to fight to gain the rights of the oppressed. 
Those who are able to control their inner selves and their desires become stronger in the face of those who wrong them until they get back their rights.

Early Muslims used to read the Quran a lot in Sha`ban in preparation for Ramadan. 
They also used to give out in charity in Sha`ban to help the poor and the needy observe fasting during Ramadan. They also used to pray to God to bless the months of Rajab, Sha`ban, and Ramadan.
This means that every Muslim should make du`a a strong tool in making the best of Ramadan. Du`a should be recited before Ramadan that you witness this month, during Ramadan that God will accept your du`a for yourself and for others, and after Ramadan that God will accept your fasting and reward you abundantly for it.

Suggestions and Useful Tips For Ramadan

It is said that: “Rajab is the month of planting seeds, Sha`ban is the month of watering the seeds, and Ramadan is the harvest season”. Therefore, think of what you want to harvest in Ramadan and start planting it and taking care of it in Rajab and Sha`ban.
A famous du`a of Prophet Muhammad:

"Oh Allah give us the blessings of the month of Rajab and Sha`ban and allow us to reach Ramadan." (Ahmad)
During Sha`ban remind yourself and your family of the virtues of fasting.
 Have at least a weekly session with your wife/husband and kids to talk about the significance of fasting. 

Get a booklet on fasting and read it with your children to make them love fasting. 

Focus on the virtues of Ramadan, that it is the month during which the Quran was revealed and that this month has the Night of Power which is better than a thousand months.

Always remember that in Ramadan rewards are multiplied, the gates of heaven are opened, the gates of hell are shut, and sins are forgiven.

 Be sure of God’s mercy on Muslims who observe fasting faithfully and avoid committing sins completely.

To make Ramadan the best month of the year, remember the following:

Strengthen your faith during this month by confirming your belief in the unity of Allah.

Have the intention of pleasing Allah with all your acts of worship.

Keep away from the things that nullify your faith.

Follow the footsteps of Prophet Muhammad.

Feed the poor and the needy. Feel the gift of giving in Ramadan.

Before going out for `Eid prayer, make sure to pay Zakat al-Fitr.

Perform the daily prayers at their fixed times and in congregation as much as you can.

Attend theTarawih prayers constantly and perform extra prayers. 

Rediscover the power of prayer in Ramadan and concentrate much while praying.

 Leave this worldly life behind your back once you raise your hands and sayAllahu Akbar (God is the greatest).

Visit your family members and relatives.

Observe i`tikaf (retreat in the mosque) during the last ten days of Ramadan, if you can.

Make the Quran your companion in Ramadan and have the intention to finish reading it at least once.

Have the intention to offer sincere repentance to Allah.

Have the intention to refine your manners and the way you treat others.

Make any dawah effort during Ramadan if you can, like distributing Ramadan-related dawah materials (CDs, booklets, videos, PDF files, etc.).

If you have the financial means, make iftar for new Muslims in your community to help them integrate with their fellow Muslims. You can also invite non-Muslims to such events to get to know them and introduce Islam to them through fasting.

Make iftar meals and gifts for orphans and marginalized children to make Ramadan a happy occasion for them.

Prepare your du`a (supplication) list. Write down the du`a (supplication) that you want to recite throughout the month. 
You can ask Allah for anything and everything.

 Choose the proper times and occasions of offering the du`a. 
The best supplication is during prostration, while offering the late night prayer, in the last days of Ramadan, and during Laylat al-Qadr (the Night of Power).

Prioritize your list of supplications. Observe the etiquette of making supplication. 

Start your supplication with praising Allah and sending peace and blessings to the Prophet Muhammad. Face the qiblah (direction) and raise your hands.

 Be sure that Allah will never let your hands empty when you pray to Him. Do not forget the oppressed people, the people of Syria, and Muslims in Burma (Myanmar).

We pray to Allah to allow us to live till next Ramadan, and make it the best Ramadan ever.

10 great goals to set for this Ramadan

http://www.wikihow.com/Make-the-Most-out-of-Ramadhan

#رمضان 2015 و لماذا لا يحترم الإعلام العربي رمضان؟


رمضان 2015 مش هتقدر تبطل قرف من القنوات غير انة بقى مستفز كل سنة اكتر عن الى قبلة مليارات تتصرف علشان تلهى الناس و دة هدفة الظاهرى هو الترفية .
لكن شهر رمضان الكريم بقى هو هدفهم من السنة الى السنة الى بعدة استفزاز اكبر و اكبر لية رمضان بالذات !!


غير شرب الخمر و الحشيش و العلاقات الجنسية الشاذة فى المسلسلات رمضان فا طبعا احسن شد الفيشة التلفزيون خالص دامغك من غسيل المخ الى بيحصل دلوقتى و من اربع سنين فاتو لكل العرب من وقت الربيع العربى 
عموما اسيبكم مع الارقام الى ترعب بجد ان ممثل ياخد مليارات و العالم و الدكتور مش معة مليون حتى واحد!!



لماذا لا يحترم الإعلام العربي رمضان؟؟؟
دكتور مصطفى محمود 
لماذا يتحول رمضان إلى شهر ترفيهى بدلا من شهر روحاني؟ .. لست شيخا ولا داعية … ولكني أفهم الآن لماذا كانت والدتى تدير التلفاز ليواجه الحائط طوال شهر رمضان … كنت طفلا صغيرا ناقما على أمي التى منعتني واخوتى من مشاهدة فوازير بينما يتابعها كل أصدقائي .. ولم يشف غليلى إجابة والدتي المقتضبة “رمضان شهر عبادة مش فوازير”. لم أكن أفهم منطق أمى الذي كنت كطفل أعتبره تشددا فى الدين لا فائدة منه .. فكيف سيؤثر مشاهدة طفل صغير لفوازير على شهر رمضان؟ من منكم سيدير جهاز التلفاز ليواجه
الحائط في رمضان
مرت السنوات وأخذتني دوامة
الحياة وغطى ضجيج معارك الدراسة والعمل على همسة سؤالي الطفولى حتى أراد الله أن تأتيني الإجابة على هذا السؤال من رجل مسن غير متعلم فى الركن الآخر من الكرة الأرضية … كان ذلك الرجل هو عامل أمريكي فى محطة بنزين اعتدت دخولها لشراء قهوة أثناء ملء السيارة بالوقود فى طريق عملى … و فى اليوم الذي يسبق يوم الكريسماس دخلت لشراء القهوة كعادتى فإذا بى أجد ذلك الرجل منهمكا فى وضع أقفال على ثلاجة الخمور… وعندما عاد للـ (كاشير) لمحاسبتي على القهوة سألته وكنت حديث عهد بقوانين أمريكا :
“لماذا تضع أقفالا على هذه الثلاجة؟؟” .. فأجابنى :”هذه ثلاجة الخمور وقوانين الولاية تمنع بيع الخمور فى ليلة ويوم الكريسماس يوم ميلاد المسيح”…
نظرت إليه مندهشا قائلا : أليست أمريكا دولة علمانية .. لماذا تتدخل الدولة فى شئ مثل ذلك؟ ..
فقال الرجل :”الإحترام.. يجب على الجميع احترام ميلاد المسيح وعدم شرب الخمر فى ذلك اليوم حتى وإن لم تكن متدينا .. إذا فقد المجتمع الاحترام فقدنا كل شئ”.
الاحترام … (الاحترام) ظلت هذه الكلمة تدور فى عقلى لايام وأيام بعد هذه الليلة … فالخمر غير محرم عند كثير من المذاهب المسيحية فى أمريكا .. ولكن المسألة ليست مسألة حلال أو حرام .. انها مسألة احترام … فهم ينظرون للكريسماس كضيف يزورهم كل سنة ليذكرهم بميلاد المسيح عليه السلام .. وليس من الاحترام السكر فى معية ذلك الضيف … فلتسكر ولتعربد فى يوم آخر إذا كان ذلك أسلوب حياتك … أنت حر … ولكن فى هذا اليوم سيحترم الجميع هذا الضيف وستضع الدولة قانونا


 55 مسلسلاً سيتم عرضها في رمضان يدعو إلى الوقوف عند هذه الظاهرة التي أصبحت تؤرق الكثيرين، متسائلين في الوقت نفسه من الهدف وراء هذه المسلسلات في رمضان بالذات. وقالوا إن 31 مسلسل مصري، و13 شامي، و11 خليجي صرف عليها مليار و375 مليون، وهي مبالغ كان ينبغي أن تستغل في بناء المستشفيات والمجمعات السكنية، وفيما ينفع الناس.


1/18/2015

#FreeSpeechStories #France accused of 'double standards'



Tens of thousands of fans of the French comic Dieudonne - often criticised as anti-Semitic - are making claims of hypocrisy and double standards after French authorities opened up dozens of cases against people accused of justifying terrorism.

Fans of the controversial comedian reacted angrily after he was arrested and charged with condoning terrorism for a remark on his a Facebook page: "je me sens Charlie Coulibaly" ("I feel like Charlie Coulibaly").
The remark, which has since been taken down, was a mash-up of the#JeSuisCharlie tag and the name of Amedy Coulibaly, the man who killed a policewoman near a Jewish school and four people at a Jewish supermarket in Paris. Dieudonne later defended the remark by saying he felt like he was being persecuted by authorities as if he were a terror suspect.
"Freedom of expression is dead, but its funeral on Sunday was pretty!!" said one of the comedian's Facebook fans, referring to the enormous march through Paris in support of Charlie Hebdo.
"WHAT HYPOCRISY!!!!!" shouted another commentator. "You can legally caricature and insult the prophet and the Muslim world: the oligarchy calls this freedom of expression ... We are in a pseudo-democratic dictatorship."

Dieudonne is a comedian with a history of making crude jokes about the Holocaust (and occasionally getting into legal trouble). He has a huge following on social media including more than 900,000 Facebook fans. Most of the comments on his page were in support of the comedian, and his name was trending briefly on Twitter earlier in the week, but there were a few fans who thought Dieudonne had crossed a line.
"There is a big difference between freedom of expression and incitement to hatred," said one fan. "He knew what to expect ... Charlie Hebdo made caricatures of the prophet that I haven't agreed with, it has made a mockery of the prophet, made some laugh, shocked others, but there was no incentive to hatred and this is a big difference."

The arrest of Dieudonne was just one of dozens of cases - up to 100according to one estimate - opened by the French authorities since the attacks. Some people have even been jailed already under fast-track legislation that was passed last year.
In a typical year, only one or two people are arrested for speaking out in favour of terrorism, said Emmanuel Pierrat, a French media lawyer and member of PEN International, which supports free expression.
Pierrat told BBC Trending that free speech is an idea at the core of the French nation, but one that in his view has been eroded over the years by exceptions for things including hate speech.
"We have weakened the principle of freedom of speech, for good intentions, but without thinking about the consequences. We need to think about how we can recover the idea of freedom of speech after an event that is so emotional, like the one in Paris (last week)," he said.
He cautioned however, that Dieudonne's statements could not be directly compared with the Charlie Hebdo cartoons showing the Prophet Muhammad.
"One thing is for sure, in France you can make drawings or speeches against ideology or against religion. The French revolution of 1789 abolished the crime of blasphemy" and courts have consistently upheld the legality of speech directed at religions or historical religious figures, he says.
Pierrat, who represented Michel Houellebecq when the author wascleared of charges of religious hate speech against Muslims in 2002, says the Dieudonne case will be difficult to judge given the ambiguity of the comedian's outburst. But he says he believes the authorities are made a mistake by arresting him. A trial is scheduled for next month.

"If Dieudonne wins, he will be like a hero," Pierrat says. "It will gives a lot of young people the idea that he is a champion of Muslims or immigrants ... he's no longer a comedian or an actor, but instead his audiences are far-right sympathisers."
"What makes me somewhat afraid is that French justice is speeding up when it comes to these questions," he says. "Like Americans after 11 September, the worry is that judgments are coming too quickly, and influenced by a very emotional event."


Blog by Mike Wendling

3/22/2014

Happy Mother’s Day

Happy Mother’s Day to all Egyptian and Arab mothers all over the globe celebrating this day today , even if it was late. 

Happy Mother Day to all the martyrs’ mothers from all parties who lost their children especially in last year because of a disgusting fight over power. Happy Mother Day to the Mothers of the detainees who are waiting for the return of their children back home safe. 
Happy Mother Day to all the fantastic women and mothers working hardly to provide their children a better life. 
Happy Mother Day to all mothers in the world. 

2/20/2014

Five Reasons Why I Love #Egypt

With a string of bad news coming out of my beloved homeland (from bombings to fatal road accidents and lost mountain climbers), I have fallen into a bout of depression.
That depression then turned into anger (I got mad, I got very mad!).  Overwhelmed with emotions that I didn’t know how to digest, I decided to try and look at the bright side and remind myself of all the things I love about Egypt.

The Egyptian Smile
There is no other smile out there that is as genuine as that of an Egyptian. The radiating goodness and positivity you feel, even in these hard times, comes off as so genuine that it becomes contagious. Enough to turn your day around.
Egyptian Chivalry
Egyptians band together in times of trouble. If they know you or not, they will have your back regardless. Very recently, I had a very bad car accident on the way to Hurgahda (the car flipped three times). Complete strangers came to our rescue, flipped the car over and came running with their first aid kits.
As we were only two girls on the road, one truck driver took it upon himself to make sure we were taken care of, getting us into an ambulance. We thought that would be the last of us seeing him, but to our surprise we found him waiting for us at the Ras Gharib hospital and he made sure to take all the administrative work off our hands so we could concentrate on getting checked up.
I don’t know if God sent us an angel or if, like they say, “chivalry is not dead,” but this man will always leave an ever lasting, amazing impression of my fellow countrymen.
rwacegypt.blogspot.com


We Have the Beach All Year Round
Not everyone is as lucky as us to be able to go lay by the beach in December or party on the sand in April. With temperatures that would make an eskimo jealous, I have to say we are blessed with unrivaled beaches and gorgeous temperatures.
beachesegypt

Egyptian Creativity
Leave it to us Egyptians to come up with the most absurd inventions possible, from some that are outright genius (check video below) to some that get their job done but are a bit ridiculous.
Since the onset of Egypt’s revolution we’ve seen unbelievable inventions come out, like the pan hat that was used as a protective helmet in Tahrir.
Long live the Egyptian man’s mind – you put a smile on my face every day.
coolhategyptcreativity

Egyptian Humor
Leave it to us that in times of dire tragedy we find the humor in everything. When everyone wants to escape Egypt and is looking for a safe haven abroad we of course have to turn it into a joke. It is probably a psychological ailment we all suffer from, deferring our real issues through humor, but hey, it definitely makes us smile when everything else is so grim!
egyptianhumor