SISI MUST GO , before it is too late

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SISI MUST GO 
 Before it is too late



With each planeload evacuating Russian and British tourists, Sharm el-Sheikh can feel its life blood ebbing.
Arthur, on a fixed salary of $255 ($63 more than Egypt's minimum wage) says: “I don’t know what happened on that plane. I have a feeling we are being manipulated and I prefer not to think about it. I think the West is trying to force Egypt to do the things it wants and this accident is a perfect opportunity for it to force us to, force us in a financial way.”
Ahmed, a diving instructor turned taxi driver, agrees: “They want to kill us. I don’t see any other explanation. Here, there are only Russian and English tourists left, and those are the ones who are going home.”
The Western plot to kill Sharm el-Sheikh is richly orchestrated by the linguistic creativity of the pro-government media. When a stranded British tourist harangued the British Ambassador John Casson, she was reported by pro-government Al Ahram as saying: “We want to continue our holiday and we do not want to leave now.”
What she actually said (documented in a YouTube clip)




was: “What is the problem? What is the real problem? Why are we here? ...There was a security problem this morning and you are now here to resolve it. Why are we here then, while the rest of the people have gone home?”


Foreign hands are also, apparently, at work in Alexandria. When storms and heavy rain caused widespread flooding in Egypt’s second largest city, killing 17 and injuring 28 - which happens regularly because the city’s drainage system cannot cope - the government’s response was to arrest 17 members of the Muslim Brotherhood, who are accused of blocking sewage pipes, damaging electricity transformers and rubbish containers.

There are other scapegoats for state failure. On Wednesday, the prosecution in Giza released one of Egypt’s most powerful businessmen and his son, Salah and Tawfik Diab, on $6,385 bail, after three nights in detention. Earlier, a criminal court cancelled a decision to freeze the financial assets of Diab, Mahmoud El-Gammal and 16 others. Only assets related to the New Giza housing compound project are still frozen, with Diab accused of illegally acquiring state-owned land. These are Egypt’s richest men and former backers of the coup in 2013. Diab is co-founder of Al-Masry Al-Youm, one of Egypt's largest privately-owned daily newspapers. His co-founder, Hisham Kassem, says he believes Diab's arrest may have been a result of the paper's coverage.

The arrest of the 16 Mubarak-era businessmen was a message from the government. Wael al-Ibrashi, the pro-Sisi TV anchor in Dream TV, spelt it out. He quoted a “sovereign source” meaning a top government or security official who told him that there are suspicious actions by a number of businessmen to cause chaos and economic crisis in the country by transferring their money outside the country. They were convinced by enemy sources that there will be a major event happening in Egypt soon.
The financial markets are unimpressed by these pyrotechnics, although they agree that the state’s finances are going south. The Egyptian Pound is on its fastest decline since the reign of King Farouk. Changing the governor of the central bank, which is now trying to support the pound by getting interest rates to rise and injecting dollars into the banks, is not going to stop a further devaluation which analysts say is inevitable. Already that pound has lost 14 percent of its value in just ten months.
Mohammad Ayesh, writing in Al-Quds Al-Arabi, gives three reasons for the decline and fall of the currency: the cost of keeping the army on the streets; the collapse of tourism which accounts for up to 11 percent of GDP and generates a fifth of the country’s foreign exchange earnings; and lastly corruption. Giving money to an Egypt, where up to 40 percent of the economy is controlled by the army, is literally pouring money into a black hole. As a consequence, the foreign currency in the central bank is currently dropping by $1bn each month.
Egypt’s currency crisis must be regarded as unique in the annals of financial mismanagement. Just over two years ago, Abdel Fattah al-Sisi took over, his wallet stuffed with cash: he had the backing of two of the Gulf’s richest states, the US, EU and oil and gas multinationals. By one measure alone, the leaked and authenticated tapes of conversations Sisi had with his closest advisers, Saudi Arabia, the United Arab Emirates and Kuwait gave Egypt $39.5bn in cash, loans and oil derivatives between July 2013, the date of the coup, and sometime between January and February of 2014. Since then, some calculate the sum is closer to $50bn. Where has all this money gone? One thing is for sure: Egypt is not going to get another Gulf handout.
Wherever you look in the chaos of Egypt today, the finger points at one man - Sisi - and at one institution - the Egyptian army. It is he and it, not “foreign hands” which are at the epicentre of the country’s instability.
Dictators can do bloodshed. Neither youth gunned down in their prime, nor the grief of their parents, make them hesitate. Comparisons between Raba’a and other massacres like Tiananmen, or Andijan mean little to them. Nor does the small library of human rights reports and witness statements which now exists to catalogue their crimes - death in detention, torture in custody, kangaroo courts, mass death sentences. All this Sisi has absorbed.
But rottweilers have to provide protection. They have to do their job. Sisi does not. He is now weaker as an absolute ruler than at any time since he took over. He faces the real and imminent prospect of losing control - over the economy, politics, and security. The state itself is failing.
Curiously that visit to London, in which he had vested so many hopes and so much effort, might yet prove to be the turning point in his presidency. And even more curiously, it was his host, David Cameron, a prime minister who has subverted a foreign policy ostensibly based on promoting democracy to a frantic search for trade and arms deals, who turned out to be his chief executioner.
Sisi spent the week saying he had Sinai and the Islamic State (IS) militant group under control.
A Russian airliner downed by a bomb placed in the luggage compartment? That was nothing more than “propaganda”. His twin aims were to position himself as the guard dog in the war against IS and to increase trade links. Both were shattered by Cameron’s decision to suspend flights to Sharm el-Sheikh, a decision followed by Dutch, German, Irish carriers and by Russia itself.  
Sisi found himself cut out of the intelligence loop he had fought so hard to be at the centre of, not only for Sinai, but Libya and Syria, too. The Americans, British and Russians were sharing intelligence with each other, not him. A visit arranged to increase British-Egyptian security co-operation, a visit designed to cement trade ties with one of Egypt’s largest foreign direct investors turned into an intelligence disaster and a wake for Egypt’s tourist industry.
Sisi is losing battles on multiple fronts. The physical one in Sinai first and foremost: the IS insurgents known as 'Wilayat Sinai' - or Sinai Province (SP) - are growing in strength. It and its predecessor conducted more than 400 attacks between 2012 and 2015, killing more than 700 military officers and soldiers, nearly twice the number of military casualties in one province of Egypt than the insurgency that took place in the whole of the country from 1992 to 1997. The SP’s most daring attack took place in July this year when it targeted 15 military and security posts and destroyed two. Over 300 men took part. They used anti-aircraft Igla missiles to force the Egyptian army’s US-supplied Apaches away. They mined their retreat. The operation lasted for 20 hours.
The insurgency in Sinai preceded the military coup. But the coup changed its character and its quality. Figures provided by the Tahrir Institute for Middle East Policy show that in the 23 months before June 2013, there were 78 attacks, an average of 3.4 attacks per month. In the same period after the coup, there were 1,223 attacks, or 53.2 attacks per months. That is a 1,464 percent increase.
Sisi has thrown everything at the population of North Sinai: extrajudicial killings of 1,347 people, the detention of 11,906, the deportation of 22,992, the destruction of at least 3,255 buildings. As his Israeli backers are now admitting, Sisi is making every mistake in the counter-insurgency rule book. He has indeed turned Sinai into South Sudan, which he himself warned army officers not to do when he worked for Morsi.
Even more important than the physical battle is the political one. Sisi has been as careless with his supporters as he has been with Egypt in general. Sisi has emptied the polling booths, with dramatically low turnouts for elections. The turnout for the recent parliamentary was so low  - under three percent on the first day - that the Abdullah Fathi, the head of the Egyptian Club for Judges said: "There were no wrong doings, no irregularities, no exchange shouting, and even no voters . . . " And then he laughed.
The supporters of the 3 July military coup have each been on a slow but brutal journey of discovery. They have been slow to admit it. None more so than the Soueif family.
Laila Soueif and her son the blogger and hero of the secular left, Alaa Abd El-Fattah, both encouraged the army to clear Raba’a and al-Nadha sit-ins. Laila said: “This protest in al-Nahda, in particular, must be dispersed immediately by the police. We see them every day in Giza shooting at the sky, then they hold banners saying peaceful protests, peaceful what? Every day they kill people and say they (killers) were baltagia (thugs paid by the Ministry of Interior). I didn't see any baltagia."
While Alaa said: “This is an armed protest and, for over a day now, there have been clashes.
They have fought in four residential areas. There is no political solution to this, this needs a security solution. At least contain them, my mother and I were attacked as we were walking through. I'm not saying hurt them. I'm saying contain them.”
Today Alaa is in jail, one of 41,000 political prisoners and Laila has been on hunger strike. Laila says: “Sisi is the head of the most oppressive and criminal regime Egypt has seen during my lifetime, and I am almost 60.”
She is right, belatedly. Sisi is the head of the most oppressive and criminal regime Egypt has seen in its modern history and he has to go. If he does not, Egypt is set on a path of disaster, a disaster that could end in the disintegration of the state and mass emigration to Europe. Before that happens, someone else must step in, even if, as seems increasingly likely, that someone else is another army officer.
David Hearst is editor-in-chief of Middle East Eye. He was chief foreign leader writer of The Guardian, former Associate Foreign Editor, European Editor, Moscow Bureau Chief, European Correspondent, and Ireland Correspondent. He joined The Guardian from The Scotsman, where he was education correspondent.
The views expressed in this article belong to the author and do not necessarily reflect the editorial policy of Middle East Eye.
Photo: Egyptian President Abdel Fattah al-Sisi arrives at 10 Downing Street to meet British Prime Minister David Cameron on 5 November 2015 in London (AA)
http://www.middleeasteye.net/columns/sisi-must-go-it-too-late-1711093598#.dpuf

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Egypt: Establish International Inquiry Into Rab’a Massacre

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(Beirut) – Egyptian authorities have held no government official or member of the security forces responsible for the mass killing of protesters in Cairo’s Rab’a al-Adawiya Square two years ago. On August 14, 2013, security forces killed at least 817 people and most likely more than 1,000 at a mass sit-in in what probably amounted to crimes against humanity.

Given the Egyptian government’s refusal to properly investigate the killings or provide any redress for the victims, the United Nations Human Rights Council should establish an international commission of inquiry into the brutal clearing of the Rab’a al-Adawiya sit-in and other mass killings of protesters in July and August 2013. The African Commission on Human and Peoples’ Rights should establish a similar investigation.





An officer from the Egyptian Central Security Forces (CSF) takes aim at a crowd of retreating protesters as security forces disperse the Rab’a sit-in on August 14, 2013.
© 2013 AFP/Getty Images


“Washington and Europe have gone back to business with a government that celebrates rather than investigates what may have been the worst single-day killing of protesters in modern history,” said Joe Stork, deputy Middle East director. “The UN Human Rights Council, which has not yet addressed Egypt’s dangerous and deteriorating human rights situation, is one of the few remaining routes to accountability for this brutal massacre.”




The United States and Egypt’s European allies, rather than seriously addressing the rank impunity of President Abdel Fattah al-Sisi’s government, contend that it is a national security priority to resume their relationships with Egypt, including providing Egypt with military aid and hardware.
The dispersal of the Rab’a al-Adawiya sit-in occurred on August 14, 2013, a little more than a month after the Egyptian military – under then-Defense Minister al-Sisi – removed Mohamed Morsy, Egypt’s first freely elected president and a former high-level official in the Muslim Brotherhood. Morsy’s ouster followed mass protests against his rule. Afterward, Brotherhood supporters and others opposed to the military’s actions held protests throughout Egypt. Security forces systematically confronted the protests with deadly force. Between Morsy’s ouster on July 3, 2013, and August 16, 2013, Human Rights Watch documented six instances when security forces unlawfully killed protesters, leaving at least 1,185 people dead.
The dispersal of the Rab’a al-Adawiya Square sit-in, where the crowd reached 85,000 at its height, was the worst of these incidents. The government announced its intention to clear the sit-in but did not announce a date. At first light on August 14, security forces using armored personnel carriers and snipers fired on the crowd with live ammunition shortly after playing a recorded announcement to clear the square through loudspeakers. Police provided no safe exit and fired on many who tried to escape.
Authorities had anticipated a high number of casualties; both Interior Minister Mohamed Ibrahim and Prime Minister Hazem al-Beblawy said publicly after the dispersal that they had expected that more protesters would have been killed. A year later, al-Beblawy was quoted as saying in an interview with al-Masry al-Youm, an independent newspaper, that “all options were bad” for resolving the sit-in and that anyone who “committed a mistake” should be sent to court.




       Washington and Europe have gone back to business with a government that celebrates rather than investigates what may have been the worst single-day killing of protesters in modern history. The UN Human Rights Council, which has not yet addressed Egypt’s dangerous and deteriorating human rights situation, is one of the few remaining routes to accountability for this brutal massacre.

Joe Stork


Earlier, Egyptian military and police killed 61 protesters outside the Republican Guard headquarters on July 8 and 95 protesters at Cairo’s Manassa Memorial on July 27. On the day of the Rab’a dispersal, police killed at least 87 protesters while clearing another Cairo sit-in at al-Nahda Square. On August 16, police killed at least another 120 people who continued to protest Morsy’s ouster in Ramsis Square in downtown Cairo.
The widespread and systematic nature of these killings, and the evidence Human Rights Watch collected, suggests that the killings were part of a policy to use lethal force against largely unarmed protesters, making them probable crimes against humanity.
In December 2013, the Egyptian government established the June 30 Fact-Finding Committee, named after the date on which protests against the Morsy government began, to look into the killings and the events that precipitated and followed them. The government released an executive summary of the committee’s findings on November 26, 2014, that did not recommend charges against any government official or member of the security forces.
The government has not released the full report and has not signaled any intention to do so. The Prosecutor General’s office, which has the prerogative and responsibility to open criminal investigations, has not announced any charges. On July 16, al-Sisi’s cabinet approved renaming Rab’a square after Hisham Barakat, the prosecutor general who gave legal approval to the 2013 dispersal and who was assassinated in June.
The only prosecution to emerge from the mass killings of July and August 2013 concerned the suffocation deaths of 37 protesters on August 18, 2013. The men, who had been arrested at the Rab’a dispersal, died after a policeman fired a teargas canister inside the overcrowded prison van where they were temporarily held. On August 13, 2015, a court reduced a 10-year sentence for a police lieutenant colonel involved in the deaths to 5 years following a retrial. The case could still proceed to Egypt’s highest appellate court. Three lower-ranking officers have all received one-year suspended sentences.
Police arrested hundreds of protesters during the Rab’a sit-in dispersal and held them in pretrial detention for nearly two years. On August 12, prosecutors referred the case to trial, accusing the protesters of a number of crimes, including blocking roads and harming national unity. Al-Shorouk, an independent newspaper, reported that prosecutors have not disclosed the number of protesters being sent to trial, though lawyers believe that more than 400 are being held.
US officials have refrained from characterizing Morsy’s removal as a coup, which would have triggered the immediate halt of military aid. But after the Rab’a killings, the US cancelled planned joint military exercises with Egypt and announced a review of “further steps that we may take as necessary with respect to the US-Egyptian relationship.”
In October 2013, the US suspended the delivery of four major weapons systems to Egypt. In August 2014, it lifted that suspension and delivered 10 Apache attack helicopters. In March 2015, the administration lifted all suspensions, allowing delivery of 12 F-16 fighter jets and up to 125 M1A1 tank kits, while also announcing plans to tighten restrictions on Egypt’s military aid buying power. In August, Secretary of State John Kerry went to Cairo to lead the first Strategic Dialogue with Egypt since 2009.
European governments – particularly France, Germany, and the United Kingdom – have embraced al-Sisi’s government. Al-Sisi met President Francois Hollande in France in November 2014, and France subsequently sold Egypt 24 Rafale fighter jets and delivered the first 3 on July 21. In June 2015, al-Sisi met with Chancellor Angela Merkel in Berlin on the same day that the German industrial company Siemens signed an 8 billion euro deal to supply gas- and wind-power plants to Egypt. The government of UK Prime Minister David Cameron has also invited al-Sisi to meet.
“The lack of justice for the victims of the Rab’a massacre and other mass killings is an open wound in Egyptian history,” Stork said. “Addressing this crime is necessary before Egypt can begin to move forward.”


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#Ramadan in #Egypt 's #economy is witnessing .4 shock and surprise #SISi

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SISI said that Ramadan is often a quiet month with respect to the economic aspect in Egypt, due to the preference of investors and officials to postpone any investment decisions or regulatory beyond the end of the month, which is dominated by the character of worship, but Ramadan came this year in a different direction altogether.

The month of Ramadan ended hours before several important economic events in Egypt, some of which represents a radical change in economic direction of the state.

Monitors Editor TOM most prominent economic events that dominated by the character of'' shock and surprise''

Reducing support

Approved President Abdel Fattah al-Sisi, the first day of the month of Ramadan, a draft of the state budget for the fiscal year 2014-2015, the total budget deficit stood at about 240 billion pounds, equivalent to about 10 percent of GDP.




The president issued a decree, the law the new budget, which includes among other expenses amounted to about 789 billion pounds, and the total public revenues amounted to about 549 billion pounds, compared with a projected deficit during the current fiscal year 2013-2014 amounted to some 243 billion pounds, equivalent to about 12 percent of the GDP.

According to statements by the Minister of Finance, has been supporting the rationalization of petroleum products to save about 44 billion pounds to 100 billion pounds during the new fiscal year by moving prices rather than 144 billion pounds in the current fiscal year.

Expenses have also been reduced by about 18 billion pounds to 789 billion pounds in the budget approved expenses compared to 802 billion pounds in the draft budget, which was rejected by President Abdel Fattah al-Sisi.

He explained that he has been reduced expenses by reducing item wages by about 1.2 billion pounds and reduced item purchase goods and services by about 2.5 billion pounds and cut benefits by about 2.5 billion pounds, and transfers about 12 billion pounds.

And monitor the Editor TOM decline targeted support for 8 other sectors in the state budget ( fuel is not alone .. the government cut support 8 new sectors in the budget )

Increase the price of fuel, electricity and gas

The government approved the decision to raise the price of all types of fuel, where it was increasing the price of 80 liters of gasoline to 1.60 pounds instead of 90 pounds, and raise the price of 92 liters of gasoline to 2 pounds and 60 piasters instead of 1 and 85 pounds penny.

It also is raising the price of 95 liters of gasoline to 6.65 pounds instead of 5.65 and raise the price of diesel to 1.80 pounds instead of 1.10 pounds.

The government approved the increase in electricity prices from the start of the current bill for the month of July, in support of a plan to rationalize electricity within 5 years.

The Minister of the electricity that the average real price per kilowatt-hour currently up to about 47 pounds and the average selling price of about 22.6 penny, but in the context of restructuring in the first year would be the average selling price of 29.2 penny, and in the second 35.2 penny, and the third 40 piasters, and the fourth penny 45.5, 50.8 and fifth penny, and will show a simple profit margin for the first time in the electricity sector during the fifth year of restructuring.

The minister pointed out that the support of electricity this year after restructuring of 27.4 billion pounds, instead of the 38.7 billion pounds, if he had not been initiated in the restructuring.

And increased natural gas prices for cement factories, steel and fertilizers, following the decision to increase prices for homes in the past month.

Following the decisions of the increase in fuel prices, transport prices witnessed a remarkable heights, whilst recognizing the provincial transportation tariff increase by about 10 percent.

The network predicted Bloomberg News remarkable economic surges in the prices of goods and services in Egypt after the decision to increase the price of fuel and electricity.

Taxes taxes taxes

Sisi issued a decree amending some provisions of the Income Tax Law promulgated by Law No. 91 of 2005 and the law of stamp tax promulgated by Law No. 111 of 1980.

Included Act Amendments of income tax on capital gains on stock exchange transactions by about 10 percent, also approved a tax on the dividends of the shares at a price of 10 percent to be reduced to 5 percent of the shareholders long-term with equity of not less than 25 percent as strategic shareholders.

The project is also not subjected bonus shares distributed by companies listed on the stock exchange to its shareholders for the tax on the distributions.

It also included amendments to the Income Tax Add residing outside Egypt is supposed to pay them for taxes in case if Egypt was the center of his business or industrial or professional.

The cabinet approved amendments to the law on real estate tax, expected to yield up to about 3 pounds 3.5 billion annually when the full application of the law.

Also issued Sisi, a decree increasing taxes on liquor and cigarettes, to varying degrees, to announce after the cigarette companies to increase domestic and foreign prices of their products in response to Resolution.

He also revealed the draft general budget of the state, the government to amend the system increase in wages during the current fiscal year (2014-2015), which introduced the first of July.

The draft general budget of the state that among the amendments adopted by the government, modified system where the increase in wages was canceled tax exemption on the special allowances and stop the annexation of the basic curdled after 5 years.

The largest decline in foreign reserves

Drop in net foreign exchange reserves to Egypt to lose at the end of June, 597 million U.S. dollars, and the biggest loss recorded in 2014.

The central bank said that the cash reserves stood at 16.687 billion dollars by the end of June (initially) compared to 17.284 billion dollars in the month of May.

The Egyptian foreign reserves of foreign currencies fell by almost 205 million dollars during the month of May.

Surprise interest rates

Committee decided to monetary policy of the Central Bank of Egypt raise the overnight deposit and lending rates for one night for the first time in 2014 by 100 basis points (1 percent) to arrive at 9.25 percent and 10.25 percent respectively.

The Bloomberg network considered economic decision CBE surprise, following the decisions of President Abdel Fattah al-Sisi on increasing fuel prices and taxes on cigarettes and fuel.

Bloomberg pointed out that the central bank's decision came after the announcement of the Egyptian government to raise energy prices threatens to increase the prices of all commodities in Egypt.



http://www.masrawy.com/News/PublicAffairs/General/2014/july/29/5950909.aspx

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Let the games start Sami Anan and Presidency #Egypt

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Al Watan newspaper claimed that Former Chief of Staff and deputy commander of SCAFSami Anan announced today that he was going to for presidency in Egypt.


 The news was published in the newspaper’s Friday evening

According to Al Watan General Anan announced this during some public conference in North Coast attended allegedly by thousands of Matrouh’s tribesmen. It is quite interesting because Matrouh is considered an Islamist voting bloc , a Salafist voting bloc to be accurate.

Hours later Al Masry Al Youm claimed that it spoke to the general and he denied that he intended to run for presidency !! He did not explain the reason behind that meeting though.

When I made a quick search online , I found interesting news like for instance how in several shady news websites on how the his support campaign claim that he was the main financier of Tamaroud campaign and how he reconciled with the so-called revolutionary youth.
I do not understand what is exactly happening knowing that Al Watan is too close to what is being referred to the Deep State of Egypt

Let’s be clear that Anan is not popular anymore. He is not popular among the revolutionaries who can not forget what happened during SCAF’s rule and he is not popular among the pro-military or the NDP supporters who used to support in the past because they believe that he supported the Muslim brotherhood.

He is also believed by that conspiracy theory group that he cut his visit to the States in January 2011 only to implement the US plan to destroy Egypt ….etc.

It is worth to mention that this news comes at the same time that there are several campaigns in Egypt calling General Abdel Fatah El Sisi to run for presidential elections. It is also worth to mention that most of those campaigns if not of all them are moderated by NDPians ,Omar Suleiman and Pro-military’s figures. 
Abdel Fatah El Sisi , the new idol of the public in Egypt has not declared yet whether he will run for presidency or not.

So yes we got two possible presidential hopeful : Sami Anan and Abdel Fatah El Sisi.

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How Far Can #Egypt's Jon Stewart Go Without Being Thrown In Jail?

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Red lights flood Bassem Youssef's stage and silver glitter pours from the ceiling upon his circular, futuristic news desk. An array of dancers wearing gigantic rainbow-colored bowties file in behind Youssef, Egypt's most famous satirist. With broad smiles, they dance happily as they sing about Egypt's bloody summer. They describe how the Muslim Brotherhood won at the ballot box, but then betrayed the people's trust, and the people returned to the streets to boot them out.






-->
"Sissi fought terrorism, and so he made a coup!" concludes one of the dancers.
The song screeches to a halt. Youssef, dapperly attired in a suit, slaps his hand over the man's mouth, while two other dancers pin his arms behind his back. "Are you a member of the Muslim Brotherhood?" Youssef asks the man. "What, dude? I'm Christian," he responds.
You idiot, the joke went. You're not supposed to call it a coup at all -- it's a popular revolution.
Youssef returned on Oct. 25 with the premiere of his third season of al-Bernameg ("The Show"), a political satire program akin to an Egyptian version of Jon Stewart's The Daily Show. And his job is more difficult than ever: Since Youssef's last episode aired in June, the military deposed former President Mohamed Morsy and Egypt suffered its worst internal violence in modern history. Now, Youssef's return may answer a lingering question about the country's emerging political reality: Are you allowed to laugh at Egypt's new rulers?
The early signs are not good. Even before Youssef's new episode premiered on Oct. 25, the State Commissioner's Authority released a report criticizing a prior court ruling that dismissed charges against Youssef for insulting the presidency. The report recommended re-prosecuting Youssef, arguing that it was unacceptable to insult the president because he is a "symbol of the state."
Before an audience of roughly 200 people in downtown Cairo's Radio Theatre, Youssef did his best to walk this political tightrope. In the front row of the audience sat businessman Mohammed el-Amin -- the owner of the channel that airs Youssef's show and an antagonist of the Muslim Brotherhood. And while Youssef skewered top political officials and media supporters of the new military-backed government, he did not lay a satirical glove on its central figure -- army chief Gen. Abdel Fattah al-Sisi.
Youssef made light of the difficulty of his task. A running gag at the beginning of the episode centered on his inability to develop a script -- one of his writers merely spends his time daydreaming about the ubiquitous pro-army song "Teslam al-ayady." With political passions still running high, Youssef appeared to be asking, is there anything funny to say about Egyptian politics?
But it's precisely this fevered political rhetoric that Youssef turns into the punch line. In one segment, he played clips of television anchors delivering increasingly stupendous estimates for the crowd sizes of the anti-Morsy protests: 25 million, 40 million -- all the way up to 70 million. He cut to an interview with former Brotherhood parliamentarian Azza el-Garf, who triumphantly announced that 45 million people had taken to the streets in support of Morsy.


Looking perturbed, Youssef pulled out a calculator and began theatrically banging away; Egypt's population, after all, is only roughly 80 million. "This means one of two things," he said. "Either Egypt's population has expanded, or we have pimps who play both sides!" 


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#Egypt After the revolution

It is two years since Egyptian anti-government demonstrators began taking to the streets in a series of protests that swept President Hosni Mubarak from power.

Egypt's revolution began on 25 January 2011, the "Day of Revolt", when tens of thousands of marchers occupied Cairo's Tahrir Square to protest against President Hosni Mubarak and his government. Simultaneous protests were held across the country. In the following days, demonstrations became more violent, coming to a climax with running clashes in Cairo between pro- and anti-government demonstrators

 Despite efforts by the authorities to disperse the protesters, they refused to move and set up camp in Tahrir Square. On 4 February, dubbed the "Day of Departure", hundreds of thousands of people demonstrated in Cairo demanding Mr Mubarak leave office. But it took another week for the president to accept his fate. He finally agreed to step aside on 11 February after protesters marched on the Presidential Palace.

 After Mr Mubarak’s departure, Egypt’s parliament was dissolved and the country’s constitution suspended. The Supreme Council of Egyptian Armed Forces declared it would hold power for six months or until elections could be held. But while major protests subsided, uncertainty about the country’s future meant many protesters continued to return to Tahrir Square, calling for their demands for change to be met.

 Tensions soon built between the pro-democracy movement and the new military leadership. Protesters were drawn again to Tahrir Square to press military rulers to keep promises on political reform. Demonstrations turned violent. However, despite the unrest, voting in parliamentary elections took place between November 2011 and January 2012, with the Muslim Brotherhood-affiliated Freedom and Justice Party taking almost half the share of votes.

 Newly-elected representatives of the People’s Assembly - parliament's lower house - met for the first time in January 2012 and the Supreme Council of the Armed Forces transferred legislative authority to them. However, a court later dissolved the assembly amid accusations that it was dominated by Islamists. Despite this, in May, voting began in Egypt’s first free presidential election, with the Muslim Brotherhood’s Mohammed Morsi declared the winner in June.
 The Islamist president’s first months in office were marked by political tensions and street protests. One of his first acts was to issue a decree overruling the court decision to dissolve parliament. The move effectively placed a panel tasked with writing the new constitution above judicial review. Amid public outrage, Mr Morsi later rescinded most of his decree, but still pushed ahead with a referendum on the draft constitution, which was approved in December.

 Opposition groups continue to accuse Mr Morsi and his Muslim Brotherhood backers of betraying the goals of the revolution. They want to see radical changes to Egypt's newly-adopted constitution, which they say fails to guarantee personal freedoms and rights for women and minorities. Parliamentary elections in 2013 are likely to set the stage for yet another electoral battle between surging Islamists and their fractious liberal and leftist opponents.

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Video Game Inspired by Clashes in #Egypt and Italy Allows Gamers to Fight the Police

Video Game Inspired by Clashes in Egypt and Italy Allows Gamers to Fight the Police

 









Accompanied by ominous music, shouts and sirens, the video shows a series of turbulent scenes: a man throwing an explosive into a police car, someone kicking a shop window and uniformed officers launching projectiles and marching with shields.
Over the past few years, similar tableaux have unfolded across northern Africa, the Middle East and Europe as protesters have taken to the streets to challenge despotic governments or participate in anti-austerity demonstrations.
But the events depicted in the video, which also features a replication of an image by Banksy of a masked man hurling a bouquet, were not real. They were a simulacrum created in Italy as part of a new video game called Riot, which is being designed for smartphones and will allow players to control avatars representing either protesters or police officers.
Leonard Menchiari, a director and animator from Florence who is developing the game, said in an e-mail exchange that the concept was initially inspired by a photograph of a lone protester facing a line of armored police in Cairo — a scene replicated in the game’s trailer.
A screenshot from the trailer for a new Italian video game,  
Leonard Menchiari A
 screenshot from the trailer for a new Italian video game, “Riot.”
Then, about a year ago, Mr. Menchiari said, he attended a demonstration for the first time, joining hundreds of people blocking a highway near the city of Turin to protest plans to build a high-speed train line through a nearby Alpine valley


Mr. Menchiari, 26, said that he felt that he had stepped into “a parallel world.” He wrote that he was struck by the dedication of the protesters and by a conversation he had, in a moment of relative calm, with an officer carrying a plastic shield, who suggested that the two sides might share some common values.
Eventually, though, the authorities used force to disperse the crowd.



As Mr. Menchiari described his experience:
I found myself running with a bunch of people in complete darkness in the middle of an open field, away from the scene, while police were shooting CS smoke grenades directly at us trying to hit us rather than just intoxicate us. Some grenades were shot in people’s homes, others ended up seriously injuring people.
Mr. Menchiari said Riot, which features pixel art figures and graphics influenced by the game Superbrothers: Sword & Sworcery EP, will feature events like the highway protest he participated in and present players with the opportunity to make “moral or immoral decisions.”
Conflicts will be set in Italy, Greece, Egypt, New York, and other places, he said, adding that he was seeking advice from people who have experienced various civil disturbances with an eye toward making the game realistic.
The aim, he wrote, is “to replicate the feel you get during certain situations, where the crowd thinks as a single organism.”
Mr. Menchiari said that the video game was not meant to express an ideological message. Instead, he said, he wanted to illustrate the behavior of both demonstrators and security forces while communicating the mixture of passion, adrenaline and chaos that often accompany moments when the two sides clash.
He said that he chose the game’s name to reflect the moments of confrontation that he was most interested in replicating. “I decided to call it Riot because I feel it’s the clearest, most powerful way of expressing what this game is about,” he wrote.
In an appeal for donations on the crowd-funding site Indiegogo, Mr. Menchiari wrote that he is seeking money from supporters to “enable the developers to travel, document and experience live riots going on in Italy, Greece, Egypt and possibly many other places around the world.”
Some people who discussed the game on Reddit recently professed admiration for the idea. A few, however, wondered whether the verisimilitude sought by Mr. Menchiari might make companies like Apple that run mobile phone operating systems uneasy. “Developing it for iOS,” one Reddit commenter suggested: “will mean it’s going to have to be a clean, family-friendly game without political, social or any other kind of controversy. It’s an interesting idea that’s going to be neutered by censored walled gardens. I’m sure there’s some irony in there somewhere.”

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استمرار الاشتباكات بين متظاهرين وقوات الأمن في وسط القاهرة

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محمد محمود 
شارع عيون الحرية
شارع الشهداء 
22/11/2012


تتواصل الاشتباكات بين متظاهرين وقوات الأمن في الشوارع المحيطة بمقر وزارة الداخلية ومحيط ميدان التحرير بوسط العاصمة المصرية القاهرة مما دعا الرئيس المصري محمد مرسي لعقد اجتماع مع رئيس الوزراء هشام قنديل ووزير الداخلية اللواء أحمد جمال لبحث الوضع.
وتسود حالة من الكر والفر بين المتظاهرين وقوات الأمن لليوم الثالث على التوالي في الشوارع المؤدية لوزارة الداخلية حيث يواصل المتظاهرون رشقهم لقوات الأمن بالحجارة.

































مصر: اعتقال 118 شخصا على خلفية الاشتباكات بين المتظاهرين وقوات الأمن في وسط القاهرة
مصر: اتساع نطاق الاشتباكات بين المتظاهرين وقوات الأمن في وسط القاهرة
مصريون يحيون ذكرى واقعة اشتباكات محمد محمود
مصر
واستخدمت قوات الأمن المركزي قنابل الغاز المسيل للدموع لتفريق المتظاهرين وإبعادهم من شارع محمد محمود القريب من وزارة الداخلية.
كما وأشعل المتظاهرون النيران فى إطارات السيارات لتقليل حدة الغاز المسيل للدموع.
وأعلن وزير الداخلية أن هناك تعليمات للضباط والأفراد بضبط النفس إلى أقصى درجة، مشيراً إلى أن المتظاهرين بدأوا يظهرون فى شارع الشيخ ريحان الذى يبعد عن وزارة الداخلية بعدة أمتار.
خصومة سياسية











وأكد جمال الدين قائلا "لن نسمح لأحد باقتحام الوزارة" مشيرا إلى أن "الوزارة ليس لديها خصومة سياسية مع أحد".
وأضاف "نحن نطبق القانون فقط، وما تصدينا له هو كل ما يعوق حركة المواطنين وبالقانون، مثل قطع الطرق والسكك الحديدية، ولم نواجه أى مظاهرة سلمية".
وأوضح الوزير أن بعض القوى الثورية دعت إلى إحياء ذكرى أحداث شارع محمد محمود مضيفا "نحن مع المظاهرات السلمية والتعبير عن الرأى بشكل سلمى، وكان لدينا بعض المعلومات بخصوص بعض المندسين لاستهداف المنشآت الشرطية، وعندما خرج البيان قالوا إن الشرطة تريد استهداف المتظاهرين، وهذا الكلام غير صحيح، لأننا لو أردنا شيئاً ما كنا أخرجنا البيان".
في هذه الأثناء، أقام المتظاهرون مستشفى ميدانيا في المنطقة لعلاج المصابين الذين بلغ عددهم العشرات، وذلك في الوقت الذي بدأت النيابة العامة التحقيق في الاعتداء الذي تعرض له ستوديو قناة الجزيرة مباشر مصر.
بيان النائب العام
وكان النائب العام المصري، عبد المجيد محمود، قد أًصدر بيانا أوضح أن أحداث شارع محمد محمود التى وقعت العام الماضى كان يباشر التحقيق فيها قاضى التحقيق المنتدب من وزير العدل وليست النيابة العامة.
وقدم قاضى التحقيق فيها للمحاكمة 379 متهما من المدنيين إلى محكمة الجنايات باتهامات مختلفة.


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